Skip to main content

Cohen & Cohen / A RARE FAMILLE ROSE RECTANGULAR 'ARROW GAME' PLAQUE Qianlong-Jiaqing period, circa 1795-1820

A RARE FAMILLE ROSE RECTANGULAR 'ARROW GAME' PLAQUE Qianlong-Jiaqing period, circa 1795-1820 image 1
A RARE FAMILLE ROSE RECTANGULAR 'ARROW GAME' PLAQUE Qianlong-Jiaqing period, circa 1795-1820 image 2
Thumbnail of A RARE FAMILLE ROSE RECTANGULAR 'ARROW GAME' PLAQUE Qianlong-Jiaqing period, circa 1795-1820 image 1
Thumbnail of A RARE FAMILLE ROSE RECTANGULAR 'ARROW GAME' PLAQUE Qianlong-Jiaqing period, circa 1795-1820 image 2
Lot 53
A RARE FAMILLE ROSE RECTANGULAR 'ARROW GAME' PLAQUE
Qianlong-Jiaqing period, circa 1795-1820
24 January 2023, 10:00 EST
New York

US$6,000 - US$10,000

Ask about this lot

A RARE FAMILLE ROSE RECTANGULAR 'ARROW GAME' PLAQUE

Qianlong-Jiaqing period, circa 1795-1820
Well painted in a pseudo Tang green-blue style, qinglu, with an unusual depiction of an 'arrow game', depicting an elegantly dressed lady and gentleman each holding an 'arrow-dart' in their outstretched right hands, she in a theatrical dancing pose, taking aim at a small vase on a tiled bridge on which they play the game, a fast flowing river rushes under the arches of the bridge, the scene framed by blossoming cherry trees to one side and venerable contorted pine and other trees and a pavilion roof to the other, with tall misty peaks and billowing clouds in the distance, framed.
8in (20cm) x 12in (30cm)

Footnotes

乾嘉時期 約1795-1820年 罕見粉彩《投壺》長方瓷板畫

Published:
Cohen & Cohen, A Game of Bowls, Gent, 2014, p. 87, no. 63

出版:
倫敦Cohen & Cohen古董行,《A Game of Bowls》,根特,2014年,頁87,圖版編號63

Porcelain plaques painted in blue and white, famille verte or famille rose were often used during the early and mid-Qing Dynasty in certain kinds of furniture construction, several panels at one time being incorporated for decorative purposes for example into large hardwood folding screens, the main splat at the back of chairs, the tops of suitably shaped tables, and serving trays. These were however normally of smaller size than the present lot. However, the quality of the present plaque suggests that it was always intended to be hung on a wall as a handsome display panel in its own right. Decorative porcelain landscape plaques that were designed from the outset to be hung on the wall as decoration are normally associated with a later date of manufacture; large-dimension porcelain plaques like this present lot, were in the 18th century, just as likely to have been created to be set into a hardwood frame as a standing table screen.

Additional information